INDUSTRY FORUM

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  • zbark2

    • 152

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    For the past 2+ years I’ve been that guy who has a full time job and sneaks in DFS when he can after work.

    Slowly but surely, Ive grinded my bankroll to over 5 figures. Knowing that I’m a positive player without even putting my full focus on DFS, Ive been considering the idea of playing full time. It is truly something I enjoy and my favorite hobby.

    If I were to go for it…

    My one question is what is the lowest bankroll that full-time players feel comfortable with when starting DFS as their main source of income? Is a 5 figure bankroll enough to get started full time?

    Any pros out there that can give advice of what they started with?

    Thanks!

  • BRORANNOSAURUS_FLEX

    • 24

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    • Ranked #3

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    • 2016 DraftKings FFWC Finalist

    • x4

      2018 DraftKings FBWC Finalist

    I can’t imagine quitting my job and then having to explain during an interview later in life the gap in my resume that says “full time DFS player.”

    As Petty said do both and consider it a lucrative hobby.

  • superstars92

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    @BRORANNOSAURUS_FLEX said...

    I can’t imagine quitting my job and then having to explain during an interview later in life the gap in my resume that says “full time DFS player.”

    As Petty said do both and consider it a lucrative hobby.

    That’s actually ironic because for my type of job, that could technically be helpful…but I guess it depends on if you were actually good at DFS or not.

  • monds6

    • 202

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    • x2

      2015 DraftKings FCFWC Finalist

    • 2013 DraftStreet DSFC Finalist

    Throwing my two cents in, there have been some great answers and things to think about, but I would suggest keeping it in the lucrative hobby category. There was a lot of thoughts about the financial aspects right now from some of the answers I saw, but what about 5 years from now. Are you going to get married (if you are not already), are you going to have kids. As your life changes so do your expenses, and the stability you will need. Sounds great now but what about in 2 years, 5 years, etc… Not to mention the variance everyone mentioned. Cash games are more and more competitive every day it seems. I am not sure off a two year sample size you will have enough data to know you can sustain that ROI. Best of luck with whatever you choose to do.;

  • tonytone1908

    It’s too late to be someone that makes a living off this. The money it would take has to be spent on someone that knows how to make a bigger and better algorithm and I’m pretty sure the top dogs have already hired the top guys and have the top system. The best you can hope for is to be lucky on that one night on that one slate. I play pretty much 1 LU for most slates, admitted I usually stick to playing late slates but I’ll usually throw 1 into the main because, even though I know it sucks, shitty LU’s still win sometimes.

    You can’t win if you don’t play. So I think the best way to play is to just put your ONE best LU into the shot every night. You could play 150 LU’s in one night, or you could play 1 LU for 150 nights. I know if I ever win big I’ll be tempted into playing more LU’s but the optimal way is just play your 1 best every night. I hate having 10 late night LU’s and all the good plays are spread out around them. Just go balls out for 1 LU.

    And that’s the problem. Lots of people feel like they can’t play less than optimal plays because they’re only playing 1 LU. Then you see the winning LU at the end of the night with all the guys you wanted to play but didn’t. I used to think it was a conspiracy seeing all these guys that I would never play.

    The toughest part about DFS is not just finding the good plays. It’s finding the good plays nobody else is on and avoiding all the D bags everyone else played even though they shouldn’t. Like I get suckered into Gordon Hayward on late slates even though I know the guy never gets more than 4x. Like Westbrook against PHO the other night. Dude should have had 20 fps in his sleep at the end of the 1st quarter, instead he was like -2.4 or some shit like that. And I only played the late slate. So I should especially know to avoid these guys but the money is left over and it seems like easy money right?
    RWB in the negative at the end of the 1st against PHO while looking for the triple double record? Solid gold money maker right? Same shit with Hayward. Only guy in the late night over 6k so you feel like you HAVE to play him hoping for at least 3x and he drops a pile on you.

  • tonytone1908

    But yeah.
    TL;DR

    Can’t win if you don’t play. Play 1 off the wall LU with all your wild plays in it, instead of spreading them throughout 10 different LU’s.

    Ask me? Just play 1 LU in the main every night, whether you win or not. If it’s your night to win big and the DFS gods are on your side, then you’ll win. If not, you didn’t waste your money on a bad night on 149 other LU’s and you can basically play for another half of the year instead of blowing your wad in 1 night.

    If your absolutely torn between 1 or 2 plays then add an extra LU or 2, but there’s nothing worse than having one good night and getting confident and then getting over confident and tossing it all away on Brandon frigging Ingram or something. ugh.

  • castaway1

    With the psychological pressure and daily ups and downs that even the best players go through, you’ve got a lot better chance of making a good “second job” income if DFS literally is your second job than if you toss away your teaching career to dive in with the sharks.

  • Roma315

    @superstars92 said...

    That’s actually ironic because for my type of job, that could technically be helpful…but I guess it depends on if you were actually good at DFS or not.

    I know someone with a masters who took 4 years off because of a “disability”. Now looking for a job everyone asks that question. That person has yet to find someone that with hire them.
    IMO only way you can do this fill time is hit a couple huge scores, have a year or more of bills and expenses paid, invest in low risk stocks, and hope the industry doesn’t die or you go on a bad run for two years. Unlike online poker you can go to a brick and mortar. DFS is a entirely different monster.

  • Cpjttogether

    13 % rake and taxes if you win.the pricing algorithm seems to be designed to me where there are a handfull of correct players that people have to choose from.And most people need to pay a premium fee to get on those plays in addition to the rake and taxes.Also the top heavy gpp payouts makes it so you better have a big bankroll or great bank roll management to weather the storms.

  • superstars92

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    @Roma315 said...

    I know someone with a masters who took 4 years off because of a “disability”. Now looking for a job everyone asks that question. That person has yet to find someone that with hire them.
    IMO only way you can do this fill time is hit a couple huge scores, have a year or more of bills and expenses paid, invest in low risk stocks, and hope the industry doesn’t die or you go on a bad run for two years. Unlike online poker you can go to a brick and mortar. DFS is a entirely different monster.

    Oh, I was just responding to Brorannosarus Flex’s post saying my type of job might be the only type of job in which if you had like 2 years of “Full time DFS player” on your resume, you still might get hired. Of course, this is assuming you were a good DFS player. I’m not actually advocating the OP becomes a full-time DFS player though. I responded to his post when he first posted it like a month ago saying he should do both (teaching and DFS) because the time is feasible and it is way less risky since you get the steady income from teaching.

    There are some firms in my industry who like literally have hired professional poker players and paid them pretty well (see SIG + poker, but there are other less known ones too), and DFS and poker are usually seen as similar by some of the firms in my industry (DFS is like the new poker in a way), so I think they would be willing to hire some top DFS players. Plus, my industry is kind of volatile so if it doesn’t work out for them, they can just easily fire them and not have to pay much since most of the pay is in the bonus.

    Nevertheless, I definitely don’t advocate anyone to become a full-time DFS player. Like I would even tell the best DFS players in the world (the SaahilSuds) that they shouldn’t be a full-time player (of course, they don’t care for my opinion, but that’s what I would advise them too).

  • draped

    @superstars92 said...

    Nevertheless, I definitely don’t advocate anyone to become a full-time DFS player. Like I would even tell the best DFS players in the world (the SaahilSuds) that they shouldn’t be a full-time player (of course, they don’t care for my opinion, but that’s what I would advise them too).

    to add on to this most of the top players are not solely DFS pros though. the smart ones find more reliable ways to make money using DFS (content, models, etc)

  • therayray81

    • 2011 FanDuel WFFC Finalist

    • 2012 DraftStreet DSFC Finalist

    If you are a teacher and you have off most of June/July/August, then you should take your bankroll and test things out. You should not leave your job and just go for it. What state do you teach in and how long have you taught? You should think about the impact to your pension also.

  • superstars92

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    @draped said...

    to add on to this most of the top players are not solely DFS pros though. the smart ones find more reliable ways to make money using DFS (content, models, etc)

    Yea I agree with that (I see Saahil has his own site, there’s fantasy labs with Peter Jennings, the Al Z. guy on ESPN, and of course Rotogrinders). In addition to those things, I actually don’t know why more DFS pros don’t do some sort of side income, like day trading or something. It is almost the same thing as DFS actually (fundamental + technical stuff), and the spread/fee they have to pay is like the rake. Maybe they do though, but I feel like they could do it if they aren’t going to have a day job.

  • Cpjttogether

    if I don’t win I don’t eat.

  • FDDough

    @ThatStunna said...

    40k without benefits is a lot lower than 40k with benefits, particularly as you age. You also need to figure out whether you’re serious, in which case you should be in a state with a low cost of living. Opportunity cost is also a big factor; if the industry kaplodes in the next few years, you’re the former teacher that tried to be a professional gambler. (I doubt people considering you will know the difference between gambling and DFS.)

    That said, giving it a shot over summer break is a good idea. Just don’t take dumb risks just to maybe get out of the next school year. Big wins are good; watching that big win go back to zero takes away all the pleasure of the win and then some.

    bro i see you in almost EVERY lineup i enter on FD lol

  • coachwood

    Do that shit bro! Take out a loan to double or triple your roll and it’ll be a wrap!! #bringoldchatbyin

  • WidumBoise

    @coachwood said...

    Do that shit bro! Take out a loan to double or triple your roll and it’ll be a wrap!! #bringoldchatbyin

    Quite possibly the worse advice one could give.

  • jgAllDay

    • 523

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    Awesome thread. One of the best I’ve ever read.

  • Cpjttogether

    Quit your job to be a full time Dfs player? lol. With the high rake in cash and top 5% wins all the money in gpp, you better have a dam big bank roll to weather the storms. Never mind the fact that the top 25 players are very good and everyone else is pretty good now also. Ive been a professional gambler for 22 years , because its the only chance I have. It has been made possible with wives who have very good jobs, 4 of them now. Anybody leaving a good paying job they are good at, to be a professional gambler should be aware of the extreme ups and downs. gambling is not as much financial as it is psychological . You might be able to pull it off, but become a interesting looney toon like me along the way. If you want a hobby play video games. If you have a job you like don’t quit it. This stuff is very hard. It is almost impossible now. I’m speaking of gambling in general. Dfs is even harder of course.

  • yessir4688

    AP – much respect. you are absolutely unbelievable, esp. in NBA. I won 2nd place and 4th place in a miraculous strike of luck (and basic/good understanding of nfl) in week 2 during 2017/18 season 3 dollar entry (65k). i was an infrequent/newish player. I did not use any algorithm or statistical analysis which is even more unbelievable. It was all done on feel alone and perceived performance that day based upon basic research. since that win I have struggled/lost my bankroll and much much much more. Is it algorithms or advanced statistical analysis that gets you there so much? or just a mega bank roll from millions in wins? would appreciate any feedback / general advice as you are a god in the dfs world and i would pay to learn from you. start a website like that star awesemo did.

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