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  • mattneverwins

    I know this is kinda harsh to bring to this site, but I just need to talk about it. I do not plan on talking to anyone on 1-800 gambler or the like because I don’t feel it would be useful to me.

    Im 19 years old, I first discovered DFS and sports betting when I saw recurring Fanduel commercials during the beginning of football season in 2014. I figured why not and put in $25 with the promo code for an extra $25. At that point I had already dabbled in gambling by buying scratch off tickets at stores in my area, but it was never anything too drastic and I won sometimes. I was a lazy better and figured I could just pick players names that I knew and it would pay off. In about a week between NHL and NFL, I was up about $200. I was invincible, I felt like a pro and gambling would be a means of extra money besides my cashier job at a grocery store. Of course this luck streak ended, and that $200 went down the drain. Then came another $25 deposit, and this time that was lost in about 2 days. Repeat this cycle about three more times and I was down $125. I decided to stop with it and didn’t deposit again. (about Feb/March 2015)

    Come to May of 2015, and commercials go around saying that DraftKings now offers DFS NASCAR. Being a big NASCAR fan, I had to take the opportunity. $25 went to DraftKings, and same thing happens. Win a couple hundred bucks, then a couple weeks later down to nothing. Add more, lose more, add more, lose more. Around the same time, I discovered a website called BetOnline. This website is not DFS, and contains a sports book. I figured it would be easier to pick teams instead of players. After a few times of winning and losing, it eventually went down the drain, along with another 3 or so re-deposits I put in. In the beginning of the summer last year, my gambling wasn’t awful. I was making a lot more money at work than I was spending on social activities and gambling. Hell I even went on a 6 day vacation to Mexico with my friend in January just from my minimum wage job. I started college in August of last year, and expenses went up and the lack of a job took a toll. There I learned the true value of money and what its like to be broke as hell. Given I didn’t have bills to pay, but would sometimes pass up on going out to eat and would stick with school food with my ID card swipe.

    Late February of this year I got my tax return which was a healthy $500+. I decided to throw some money back on DraftKings, and thats when I discovered RotoGrinders. I was playing NHL, and over the course of a few weeks I was up to about $400 from NHL. I was feeling great and felt like I finally discovered the right research methods to pick the right players. Of course, the amount of $$ per night on entries increased, and the losses hit like never before. 4 days and I had lost $400. I couldn’t believe it. My confidence was back out the door and I was going to give up on DFS once again, but not on gambling.

    Around the same time, which was just two months ago or so, I put another $50 in my BetOnline account. This is where I finally thought I solved my problem. I discovered parlays and round robin betting, which is making two or more bets which depend on each other in order to win. High risk high reward essentially. After a couple of nights of winning 20 here and losing 20 there I hit $300 on a night of baseball. I had done my research that day and picked the right teams and over/unders. The next day was a big day, as a 6 team round robin hit me almost $3000. I couldn’t believe it, I found the right betting strategy finally. The next week brought me another $2000 on round robins and parlays. I was at $5,700, and being 19, that was amazing. I wanted to withdraw $5,000 from my account, but due to me using a promo code for an extra $25 on my deposit date, I had to wait an extra 30 days before being allowed to withdraw. This was one of their rules after I looked it up, and I was fine with that, I would just keep on betting and making money until I could withdraw. The date I was told in an e-mail was June 11th, and I was around May 20th at the time. Long story short, by June 11th I had $200 in my account. My big mouth told my family around the house that I won money and I couldn’t withdraw yet, so by now it’s too late. To this day they still think I’m waiting on a withdrawal date. I had to win this money back, I can’t tell them I just lost over $5,000 even though I told them I was going to be careful. A couple days later, my account balance was at 0. I put 300 back into it to try to win my money back. A few days later, back to 0. At this point my bets were frantically and impulsively placed although i was still researching. I put another 200 back into it, and I hit $1,000 about last week. I was relieved, and went to build on this to get back to my original balance. Over those few days the money gradually went down and now here I am today back to 0.

    My friend and I each bought scratch offs mostly every time we hung out to this day. And mostly losing 10-30 dollars each most of the time would be laughed off as we would joke about our gambling problems. I now understand I have a real problem. I just needed to write about it. I hope some of you can share similar experience or comments. Thanks for reading.

  • dw12290

    @slcseas said...

    In my personal opinion, what you have going on doesn’t qualify as gambling addiction… At least not yet.

    Addiction is defined by consequence. When your actions begin to have consequences i.e. You can’t pay your bills or it starts damaging your relationships, yet you can’t stop, then you have a problem. At this stage it fees like you have issues with being impulsive (and what 19 year old doesn’t?).

    Reality is you haven’t lost much of your own money, unless you’re underselling it. You aren’t in denial, and the fact that you worry about it and share at this stage suggests to me you’ll be alright in the long term.

    I once lost my rent, car payment and motorcycle payment for a month and had to borrow from my roommate to cover bills. That experience was enough for me to reel it in a bit. A bad run of gambling can make you question your worth as a human being. It’s happened to me at least 5 times in my life. I think it something a lot of people go through with gambling.

    Find a new source of entertainment to occupy some of your time, and focus harder on getting laid. Game. Set. Match.

    He has a problem and by telling him otherwise I will say that he has already made another deposit and is ready to play today hoping for that big hit. I don’t care if he’s only 19 if he can’t control it now in the long term he never will. No disrespect but if your spending your rent, car payment and motorcycle payment and borrowing money from your friends you sir have an even bigger problem.

    The truth hurts and you may cuss me out but I call it the way it is.

    BTW, grammar is not my forte.

    Peace

  • bigloser11

    We all have vices and diversions. How we control them is the issue.I would personally tell anyone not to gamble.
    But if you do, play small and never let your emotions control you.

  • bighop04

    @dw12290 said...

    He has a problem and by telling him otherwise I will say that he has already made another deposit and is ready to play today hoping for that big hit. I don’t care if he’s only 19 if he can’t control it now in the long term he never will. No disrespect but if your spending your rent, car payment and motorcycle payment and borrowing money from your friends you sir have an even bigger problem.

    The truth hurts and you may cuss me out but I call it the way it is.

    BTW, grammar is not my forte.

    Peace

    I feel like he was saying he once did those things because he was an addict, and addicts are people whose problems are destroying their lives and the peoples lives around them, and this guy isn’t quite at that level…. yet.

    Look he’s 19 and it sounds like he has lost maybe 1 to 2 grand and been doing betting and DFS for about 2 years maybe. He just isn’t very responsible with his bankroll, but honestly there are a ton of people who have hobbies that cost a lot more money over the same amount of time. His hobby is DFS and gambling, but if his hobby was fishing and he spent the same amount of money on new equipment and driving to fishing spots everyone would say its okay, its your hobby. As long as this guy isn’t in debt he technically is ahead of most people in this country I’m sure.

    The only advice I would give is to be honest with your family who thinks you have money coming in, just tell them you were irresponsible and lost it back, because if not you will keep putting pressure on yourself to win it back and that will lead you to bad decision making.

  • Bglife1216

    @mattneverwins said...

    I know this is kinda harsh to bring to this site, but I just need to talk about it. I do not plan on talking to anyone on 1-800 gambler or the like because I don’t feel it would be useful to me.

    Im 19 years old, I first discovered DFS and sports betting when I saw recurring Fanduel commercials during the beginning of football season in 2014. I figured why not and put in $25 with the promo code for an extra $25. At that point I had already dabbled in gambling by buying scratch off tickets at stores in my area, but it was never anything too drastic and I won sometimes. I was a lazy better and figured I could just pick players names that I knew and it would pay off. In about a week between NHL and NFL, I was up about $200. I was invincible, I felt like a pro and gambling would be a means of extra money besides my cashier job at a grocery store. Of course this luck streak ended, and that $200 went down the drain. Then came another $25 deposit, and this time that was lost in about 2 days. Repeat this cycle about three more times and I was down $125. I decided to stop with it and didn’t deposit again. (about Feb/March 2015)

    Come to May of 2015, and commercials go around saying that DraftKings now offers DFS NASCAR. Being a big NASCAR fan, I had to take the opportunity. $25 went to DraftKings, and same thing happens. Win a couple hundred bucks, then a couple weeks later down to nothing. Add more, lose more, add more, lose more. Around the same time, I discovered a website called BetOnline. This website is not DFS, and contains a sports book. I figured it would be easier to pick teams instead of players. After a few times of winning and losing, it eventually went down the drain, along with another 3 or so re-deposits I put in. In the beginning of the summer last year, my gambling wasn’t awful. I was making a lot more money at work than I was spending on social activities and gambling. Hell I even went on a 6 day vacation to Mexico with my friend in January just from my minimum wage job. I started college in August of last year, and expenses went up and the lack of a job took a toll. There I learned the true value of money and what its like to be broke as hell. Given I didn’t have bills to pay, but would sometimes pass up on going out to eat and would stick with school food with my ID card swipe.

    Late February of this year I got my tax return which was a healthy $500+. I decided to throw some money back on DraftKings, and thats when I discovered RotoGrinders. I was playing NHL, and over the course of a few weeks I was up to about $400 from NHL. I was feeling great and felt like I finally discovered the right research methods to pick the right players. Of course, the amount of $$ per night on entries increased, and the losses hit like never before. 4 days and I had lost $400. I couldn’t believe it. My confidence was back out the door and I was going to give up on DFS once again, but not on gambling.

    Around the same time, which was just two months ago or so, I put another $50 in my BetOnline account. This is where I finally thought I solved my problem. I discovered parlays and round robin betting, which is making two or more bets which depend on each other in order to win. High risk high reward essentially. After a couple of nights of winning 20 here and losing 20 there I hit $300 on a night of baseball. I had done my research that day and picked the right teams and over/unders. The next day was a big day, as a 6 team round robin hit me almost $3000. I couldn’t believe it, I found the right betting strategy finally. The next week brought me another $2000 on round robins and parlays. I was at $5,700, and being 19, that was amazing. I wanted to withdraw $5,000 from my account, but due to me using a promo code for an extra $25 on my deposit date, I had to wait an extra 30 days before being allowed to withdraw. This was one of their rules after I looked it up, and I was fine with that, I would just keep on betting and making money until I could withdraw. The date I was told in an e-mail was June 11th, and I was around May 20th at the time. Long story short, by June 11th I had $200 in my account. My big mouth told my family around the house that I won money and I couldn’t withdraw yet, so by now it’s too late. To this day they still think I’m waiting on a withdrawal date. I had to win this money back, I can’t tell them I just lost over $5,000 even though I told them I was going to be careful. A couple days later, my account balance was at 0. I put 300 back into it to try to win my money back. A few days later, back to 0. At this point my bets were frantically and impulsively placed although i was still researching. I put another 200 back into it, and I hit $1,000 about last week. I was relieved, and went to build on this to get back to my original balance. Over those few days the money gradually went down and now here I am today back to 0.

    My friend and I each bought scratch offs mostly every time we hung out to this day. And mostly losing 10-30 dollars each most of the time would be laughed off as we would joke about our gambling problems. I now understand I have a real problem. I just needed to write about it. I hope some of you can share similar experience or comments. Thanks for reading.

    I don’t want to be rude but you calling this a gambling problem man it’s funny to me because you have no idea about having a gambling problem. What do you know about losing everything you have and I mean everything 100s off times over and over again stealing from your family and friends selling anything you have because you think you can win it back when you experience any off that and 1000 others fuckt up stuff I did just to gamble than maybe you can call it gambling problem because right now you don’t have clue about having a gambling problem

  • Zieg30

    • 630

      RG Overall Ranking

    • 2018 DraftKings FGWC Finalist

    @Bglife1216 said...

    I don’t want to be rude but you calling this a gambling problem man it’s funny to me because you have no idea about having a gambling problem. What do you know about losing everything you have and I mean everything 100s off times over and over again stealing from your family and friends selling anything you have because you think you can win it back when you experience any off that and 1000 others fuckt up stuff I did just to gamble than maybe you can call it gambling problem because right now you don’t have clue about having a gambling problem

    This is a very irresponsible response.

    There are many degrees of gambling problem. The example you give above of “life ruined, stealing to fund gambling, etc” is only the most extreme manifestation of a gambling problem. Gambling problems don’t begin there, and they certainly don’t always get there, but they’re still detrimental to ones’ health and life even if they don’t get that bad.

    The OP exhibits clear signs of a gambling problem. He has lied, at least through omission, to his family, he has repeatedly lost more money chasing his losses, he has lost more money than he can reasonably afford to lose (given his explanation of his financial circumstances), he repeatedly comes back to gambling sites despite intending to stop, AND he identifies it as a gambling problem (which, frankly, is an indicator given how most folks with problems are in denial). He needs help, not to be told things are fine and that he doesn’t have a problem.

    OP, I echo what those have said above – tell the truth to your family, find someone to confide in, and, most importantly, go cold turkey on gambling apart from getting those scratch off tickets with your friend.

  • MrFantasy

    @Zieg30 said...

    This is a very irresponsible response.

    There are many degrees of gambling problem. The example you give above of “life ruined, stealing to fund gambling, etc” is only the most extreme manifestation of a gambling problem. Gambling problems don’t begin there, and they certainly don’t always get there, but they’re still detrimental to ones’ health and life even if they don’t get that bad.

    The OP exhibits clear signs of a gambling problem. He has lied, at least through omission, to his family, he has repeatedly lost more money chasing his losses, he has lost more money than he can reasonably afford to lose (given his explanation of his financial circumstances), he repeatedly comes back to gambling sites despite intending to stop, AND he identifies it as a gambling problem (which, frankly, is an indicator given how most folks with problems are in denial). He needs help, not to be told things are fine and that he doesn’t have a problem.

    OP, I echo what those have said above – tell the truth to your family, find someone to confide in, and, most importantly, go cold turkey on gambling apart from getting those scratch off tickets with your friend.

    This is honestly the best response yet. To those that are trying to advise him how to properly manage his money for gambling and to just do it for fun etc you should be ashamed. While he is young and hasn’t ruined his life with gambling yet he’s obviously affecting himself and others with his gambling. He has admitted he has a problem and there is no reason to convince him that he doesnt

  • TimmerRC

    To the original poster, that was a brave thing to write, my man. I think you’ve got the answer in front of you, maybe you just don’t want to admit it to yourself and wrote it to get us to TELL the answer to you, and if so, here it is.

    You need to walk away from DFS, because you do indeed have a gambling problem, which you’ve realized so well. Just walk away from it, and I mean right now, I’ve had family members lose their homes over gambling problems.

    If you CANNOT, just CANNOT walk away, then contact that phone number you cited in your post, because your problem will only get bigger, never smaller.

    Again, kudos to you for the post. But you need to take it to the next level. Good luck to you, and remember, no shame buddy, you aren’t alone on this!

  • BmoreClutch

    @Bglife1216 said...

    I don’t want to be rude but you calling this a gambling problem man it’s funny to me because you have no idea about having a gambling problem. What do you know about losing everything you have and I mean everything 100s off times over and over again stealing from your family and friends selling anything you have because you think you can win it back when you experience any off that and 1000 others fuckt up stuff I did just to gamble than maybe you can call it gambling problem because right now you don’t have clue about having a gambling problem

    What an absurd response. The OP clearly has a problem. It might not be on the level of what you dealt with, but it’s still a problem.

    Kudos to the OP for recognizing that he has a problem. It’s impressive that he was able to do that at such a young age. There are plenty of people in the DFS community that are dealing with similar issues. Hopefully your post can help some of them realize (if they’re on here) that they have a problem.

    TimmerRC is 100% right. You need to walk away from DFS and any other form of gambling. You’re problem is only going to get worse if you continue.

  • tgowen

    • Blogger of the Month

    @TimmerRC said...

    You need to walk away from DFS, because you do indeed have a gambling problem, which you’ve realized so well. Just walk away from it, and I mean right now, I’ve had family members lose their homes over gambling problems.

    I tend to agree with this. I think it’s sad and short sighted to think that DFS is in any way less addicting and financially dangerous than sports betting.

    I understand this is a site that promotes DFS so this likely is an unpopular opinion to present, but I firmly believe that the only difference between the problems that gambling can cause and those that DFS is capable of is that DFS has time on its side and gambling has decades of history to highlight its problems.

  • cy1985

    Already been numerous stories about people losing $20,000, $30,000, even over $60,000 playing DFS and people ruining their lives. Most people are responsible. The key is to do these things in moderation.

    The original poster no doubt needs to seek help and should close all his DFS accounts.

  • bigloser11

    @cy1985 said...

    Already been numerous stories about people losing $20,000, $30,000, even over $60,000 playing DFS and people ruining their lives. Most people are responsible. The key is to do these things in moderation.

    The original poster no doubt needs to seek help and should close all his DFS accounts.

    I don’t doubt the numbers and there are cases w/ sport betting that the numbers are much higher.
    Why would anyone allow themselves to do this?

  • cy1985

    @bigloser11 said...

    I don’t doubt the numbers and there are cases w/ sport betting that the numbers are much higher.
    Why would anyone allow themselves to do this?

    We are also a nation where it’s never been easier to get access to credit to fund these habits. If done irresponsibly, can ruin someone’s credit score/future/etc.

  • PJGuin23

    DFS Tax Guru

    You can get an addiction to stock trading, online shopping, etc. Key is managing it. Lots of things in life are a gamble. Put money in a 401k? You are gambling. Buy a house as a 20 something single person hoping to get equity in a “starter home”? You are gambling. Key is doing the proper research and managing it.

    Now for gambling and DFS, going cold turkey has to be on the table for some. Whether it is up to the OP to do so is up to him. But what he needs to know is if his losses are say greater than 5%, 8% tops of his income in a given year, then he has his answer. Older with more responsibilities even less %.

  • TheRyanFlaherty

    I didn’t bother reading other responses (so I hope many echo this sentiment) because there’s only one answer – You can’t Gamble at all.
    If DFS registers as gambling in your brain you can’t play. Not even if it’s a freeroll, it’s always going to lead to the same self-destructive place.

    There’s no bankroll management to address a gambling problem and addictive personality.
    It always starts with a reasonable deposit and the best of intentions but it winds up consuming you. Even when you win you can’t handle it because you experience a high and feel invincible. Then eventually you’ll lose some and your bankroll will drop and you lose everything chasing and trying to get back to some imaginary number. While you do it you know you shouldn’t but you have little control .
    You wind up depressed after the fact….there’s no way out…until you make another deposit, because getting back that money will solve things and this time you’re going to play responsibly, track games and winnings, only play a certain amount a day, maybe try a new site, take advantage of a bonus etc. etc….
    I can go on but anyone that experiences this knows it’s no fun and a vicious cycle.

    I’m someone that has an addictive personality and I’ve had really bad gambling issues. Ran up thousands of dollars in credit card bills playing online poker, casinos, sports betting.
    It’s always ended badly and I’ve had to come to the realization that it;s something I can’t partake in. And really, there could be a minute chance that I can change my behavior, but gambling isn’t an essential part of life, so it’s not worth the inner turmoil, the fight, the potential relapses…to me it would be like being a smoker or alcoholic, finally quitting and then deciding you’d try to only do it on weekends…it’s not worth it and unlikely to be successful.

    At this point if anyone’s bothered to read this you may be questioning how I am on a DFS site and speaking of gambling issues and an addictive personality., so I felt I should address that as to not sound like a hypocrite.
    DFS does scratch some of that same itch that other forms of gambling have provided me, but for some reason it doesn’t register in my brain like other forms of gambling. I get upset when I lose but it never lingers. I’ve never chased money after a loss. It feels totally different because I feel like I’m in control. If I lose it’s a bad decision I made and I can do better the next day. It’s a puzzle to piece together everyday that engages my brain and I can consistently win because I’m extremely intelligent. I’m not trying to get lucky and beat Vegas or the Casino.
    DFS has provided a healthy outlet for me and for that I’m lucky. I don’t anticipate it (as I said I’ve been playing for years with no issue) but if it devolved into the negative experience and addictions I was describing above, it would certainly be something I couldn’t do anymore.

  • slcseas

    @dw12290 said...

    No disrespect but if your spending your rent, car payment and motorcycle payment and borrowing money from your friends you sir have an even bigger problem.

    The truth hurts and you may cuss me out but I call it the way it is.

    This happened to me when I was 21… I’m 33 now. I lost that money playing pit games at the casino, which I quit playing entirely about a year later. I’ve since had a long run as a profitable poker and DFS player, and more importantly I have a great and stable life that is not adversely affected by my gambling.

    But thank you for perfectly illustrating my point. I was in much worse shape than him, and have turned out better than fine. OP is experiencing something that a lot of young people go through when they are first introduced to gambling. Acknowledging the issue early on is usually a strong indicator that maturity and discretion are going to develop in the long run and he’ll regain control when the proverbial stakes are much higher. The fact that OP is demonstrating introspection and taking ownership of his actions lead me to believe he’s better off than he’s probably feeling right now in the wake of a significant loss.

    I didn’t say he definitely doesn’t have a problem, I merely suggested that until he’s experiencing real consequences in his life that it’s hard to say for sure that he’s addicted and not simply immature/irresponsible as we all were at that age.

  • Captain_Cold

    I would say that I have a bit of a gambling problem. It started a few years ago when I found an add for an NBA Freeroll for draftstreet on a sports website I used (draftrumors). I managed to win $10 and was hooked. I played very little at first, but the next nba season I started playing to the point where I nearly drained my checking account. I also managed to max out two credit cards playing on dfs knowing that my wife would somehow figure it out why they rarely worked, but I would always manage to win something big so I could pay the cards off so that they would work again.

  • jriprap24

    Yes

  • mattneverwins

    Thanks to everybody that has been trying to help me out. Long story short I lost that $34 thanks to the John Slackey and the Cubs. Ill probably take a break for at least a couple weeks. I told my girlfriend and one of my good friends about it and my friend was more understanding than my girlfriend was but they both said to hang it up for a bit. Ill probably tell my family within the next couple days once I work up the courage.

  • yeahthisiscuddy

    @slcseas said...

    This happened to me when I was 21… I’m 33 now. I lost that money playing pit games at the casino, which I quit playing entirely about a year later. I’ve since had a long run as a profitable poker and DFS player, and more importantly I have a great and stable life that is not adversely affected by my gambling.

    But thank you for perfectly illustrating my point. I was in much worse shape than him, and have turned out better than fine. OP is experiencing something that a lot of young people go through when they are first introduced to gambling. Acknowledging the issue early on is usually a strong indicator that maturity and discretion are going to develop in the long run and he’ll regain control when the proverbial stakes are much higher. The fact that OP is demonstrating introspection and taking ownership of his actions lead me to believe he’s better off than he’s probably feeling right now in the wake of a significant loss.

    I didn’t say he definitely doesn’t have a problem, I merely suggested that until he’s experiencing real consequences in his life that it’s hard to say for sure that he’s addicted and not simply immature/irresponsible as we all were at that age.

    Don’t you see how “keep going to see if it really ruins your life” is terrible advice? If the kid thinks he has a problem he should address it now before it gets to that point. Suffering isn’t a competition.

  • yeahthisiscuddy

    @mattneverwins said...

    Thanks to everybody that has been trying to help me out. Long story short I lost that $34 thanks to the John Slackey and the Cubs. Ill probably take a break for at least a couple weeks. I told my girlfriend and one of my good friends about it and my friend was more understanding than my girlfriend was but they both said to hang it up for a bit. Ill probably tell my family within the next couple days once I work up the courage.

    Good luck. I wish you all the best.

  • jimfred82

    • Blogger of the Month

    Wow. Major stones for the OP bringing a real problem to a forum that hasn’t exactly been the friendliest at times throughout the last six months or so, and nice job to everyone for taking his post seriously. Whether your advice was good or not, you all gave genuine advice… that doesn’t always happen in this day and age. Great job everyone!

    My humble opinion is that addiction is addiction, and, if you’re worried that you’re addicted, you might as well treat it as such. I recommend walking away, and here’s why: If you thought you were an alcoholic, nobody would tell you to just manage your drinking, would they?

    Best of luck! Don’t take this the wrong way, but I hope we don’t see you around here much any more! :)

  • slcseas

    @yeahthisiscuddy said...

    Don’t you see how “keep going to see if it really ruins your life” is terrible advice? If the kid thinks he has a problem he should address it now before it gets to that point. Suffering isn’t a competition.

    FWIW, I suggested in an earlier post that he take up some new hobbies and place his focus elsewhere.

    From my perspective, I just don’t see a ton of value in placing a label on a person who’s clearly at a low point emotionally and probably not thinking rationally. The fact that he’s willing to examine his decisions and consider that he may have a problem speaks well for him, and I felt it was worthwhile to reinforce that he’s not necessarily the sum of a few questionable decisions with money.

    If every person who was down on themselves was told that they were absolutely what they felt like in that moment, the world would be a pretty miserable place. I simply offered a possible measuring stick for OP to decide if this is really a problem, or if it’s possible he’s just being too hard on himself.

  • sethayates

    @slcseas said...

    FWIW, I suggested in an earlier post that he take up some new hobbies and place his focus elsewhere.

    From my perspective, I just don’t see a ton of value in placing a label on a person who’s clearly at a low point emotionally and probably not thinking rationally. The fact that he’s willing to examine his decisions and consider that he may have a problem speaks well for him, and I felt it was worthwhile to reinforce that he’s not necessarily the sum of a few questionable decisions with money.

    If every person who was down on themselves was told that they were absolutely what they felt like in that moment, the world would be a pretty miserable place. I simply offered a possible measuring stick for OP to decide if this is really a problem, or if it’s possible he’s just being too hard on himself.

    I agree with this take and the people who have posted this advice. We really don’t know OP’s situation we only know what he’s told us. There is no reason to push someone to get help if they aren’t ready to give up their addiction. If the OP wants to keep gambling here is what I would do if it were me. Sit down and create a budget (if he doesn’t already have one). Figure out how much I have left for entertainment. Then I’d decide how much of that limit I wanted to use for DFS. I’d then go to https://www.draftkings.com/account/limits

    If I could afford $100 per month I would make that my limit. These limits can’t be changed again for a set number of days (varies by state). The fact that I knew I couldn’t have anymore than $100 would help me with bankroll management. If I ran out of money and I started scheming to get around the limit (depositing elsewhere, creating another account, etc) I’d know I had a big problem. Also, if once I ran out of funds I couldn’t stop thinking about the next time I could deposit that’s also a sign that I have a problem. However, if I stay under my limit and my behavior and habits become the new norm than obviously I was just a young kid who made a couple of bad decisions after hitting a big score.

  • PJGuin23

    DFS Tax Guru

    @sethayates said...

    I agree with this take and the people who have posted this advice. We really don’t know OP’s situation we only know what he’s told us. There is no reason to push someone to get help if they aren’t ready to give up their addiction. If the OP wants to keep gambling here is what I would do if it were me. Sit down and create a budget (if he doesn’t already have one). Figure out how much I have left for entertainment. Then I’d decide how much of that limit I wanted to use for DFS. I’d then go to https://www.draftkings.com/account/limits

    If I could afford $100 per month I would make that my limit. These limits can’t be changed again for a set number of days (varies by state). The fact that I knew I couldn’t have anymore than $100 would help me with bankroll management. If I ran out of money and I started scheming to get around the limit (depositing elsewhere, creating another account, etc) I’d know I had a big problem. Also, if once I ran out of funds I couldn’t stop thinking about the next time I could deposit that’s also a sign that I have a problem. However, if I stay under my limit and my behavior and habits become the new norm than obviously I was just a young kid who made a couple of bad decisions after hitting a big score.

    Great post. I’m not qualified to play armchair psychologist but I also know such professionals are very heightened about gambling almost unnecessarily. I feel like someone should educate addiction specializing psychology professionals on DFS. It’s amazing how many have still never heard of it.

  • PJGuin23

    DFS Tax Guru

    .. to add to my last post this is why a good self evaluation is needed before seeking help. I know where “help” will lead. It maybe necessary, but it may also be overkill. I don’t know the OPs case.

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